Irenic Thoughts

Irenic. The word means peaceful. This web log (or blog) exists to create an ongoing, and hopefully peaceful, series of comments on the life of King of Peace Episcopal Church. This is not a closed community. You are highly encouraged to comment on any post or to send your own posts.

2/27/2008

In the midst of the messiness

The Rev. Peter M. Carey writes in a Lenten reflection,
I take wisdom from the words of the deranged prophet figure in the 1984 film, The Adventures of Buckaroo Bonzai across the 8th Dimension: “Wherever you go, there you are.” And, so, here we are. It is here and now that God breaks into our lives, not in some other place or time. It is here that God is, not only in mountaintop experiences, not only when we go away on retreat, not only in the midst of nature, not only in the midst of a concert hall, not only in the exhilarating rush of endorphins when we exercise.

One of the Desert Fathers said: “Your cell will teach you all you need to know.” This does not mean that we all have to become monks. For the monk, the cell was his everyday place; it was his place of work. This going to one’s cell was not a retreat from the work of the monk, but was encouragement for the monk to go to his place, to seek God in the everyday place.

Frank's photo of biking on Little Saint Simons IslandRowan Williams claims in his book, The Trial of Christ, that “hardest place to be is where we are,” for if we want to turn our selves toward God, we must first work to be fully present, which can be hard when our minds leap forward and back, and we multitask ourselves away from where we sit. Cultivating attention may offer us a deeper sense of beauty, if we have eyes to see. As Buddhist master, Thich Nhat Hahn claims, “The present moment is a beautiful moment.” And if we truly embraced the present moment, we might, indeed see the beauty of this place, and even see God.

So in the midst of the messiness of raising three children under 5, God is there. In the balancing of the checkbook, God is there. In the waiting room of the hospital, God is there. In the boring meeting, God is there. In the frustrating traffic jam, God is there. Lent might be a time when even in the rush of our appointments and commuting and to do lists we can be attentive to the place where we are, and attentive to God.
The full text of his reflection is here: Just One Thing. Peter also recommends this Lenten video:



As for me, I've been seeing other blogs again. At Episcopal Café, they reprinted something I wrote for the Episcopal Church and the Visual Arts Sketchbook called Christian Grafitti and over at Ask the Priest I answered a question from a reader asking When did early Christians start using the Old Testament as scripture?

peace,
Frank+
The Rev. Frank Logue, Pastor

1 Comments:

  • At 2/27/2008 7:12 AM, Anonymous Irenic Thoughts said…

    "As for me, I've been seeing other blogs again."

    OH! I'm speechless...

     

Post a Comment

<< Home